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Bilingual brains handle third language like natives

A bilingual brain is quickly able to handle a third language with the same neural mechanisms it uses for its native languages – putting it a step ahead of a monolingual brain, a new study has found.

Bilinguals process their L3 in the same way they process their L1, even at low proficiency. Monolinguals only develop this ability when they reach a high proficiency in another language.

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Research nibs

uni cam

‘C-WORD’ NOT SO RUDE FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS

When a prankster announced that the government would send the Conservative and Unionist Negotiating Team to Brussels for Brexit negotiations, the whole country chuckled. But do second-language users truly understand how offensive the ‘C-word’ actually is?

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Why not teach in Poland?

Matt Salusbury registration at the polytechnika great hall 002

Matt Salusbury visits Poland to discover modest pay packets for English language teachers – but generous holidays and a rich history and culture could make it a country worth considering.

It can be tough earning a living as an English teacher in Poland. Even being a native speaker there doesn’t necessarily confer an advantage over locally recruited teachers in terms of hourly rates.

There are sectors where you can make a decent living, however – the universities sector is worth a look.

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Pretty much the best job in TEFL.

Top universities UK

Universities have outstanding inspection results from the British Council inspectors, and provide some of the best teaching opportunities.

The best teaching job I ever had was in a university in the UK. I left it thirty years ago this year to become editor of the EL Gazette. I remember walking out of the campus and across Regent’s Park with a trio of French students who had volunteered to intern with us.

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A tale of two frameworks

How good are British Universities at teaching? This question has sparked the mother of all rows in UK academia.

The government has insisted that only unis with great teachers should be able to put up their fees, and then devised a byzantine student rating system called the Teaching Excellence Framework, or TEF, that no two experts agree on.

To top it all, the TEF has been boycotted by many of the students whose ratings its scores are supposed to be based on. Confused? We all are.

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