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Make A Confident Choice

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With demand for qualified teachers outstripping supply across East Asia, Duncan Verry explains why accreditation is key to raising standards

As education inspection systems worldwide strive for the improvement of educational practices to raise student outcomes – and no doubt secure bragging rights over fellow education ministers with an elevated position in the OECD Pisa rankings – it is interesting to look around the world and evaluate what impact this trend has had on language centres, if any. Unesco identifies a ‘hard governance’ and ‘soft governance’ approach to education accreditation. Hard governance is the setting of performance targets and use of data and indicators to foster competition and improvement. The soft governance approach relies on self-evaluation and creating networks for best-practice learning.

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EL Market Report: Do Chinese make the right choice?

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Melanie Butler asks why so few Chinese students choose language travel, and looks at which kinds of centres they go to

As a rule of thumb, 2 per cent of all students enrolled in local language schools in their home country will buy at least one language travel package during their studies, according to research by Student Marketing. With 300 million Chinese learning English and at least 10 million students enrolled in the estimated 50,000 language schools, this would give a potential language travel market of between 200,000 and 400,000 students. 

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Egypt’s Mountain To Climb

Matt Salusbury on the immense challenges faced by state-sector ELT

The current state of English teaching in Egypt is shockingly poor, but there’s considerable enthusiasm nationally for the language.

This offers hope that Egyptian ELT can eventually be improved. That was the message from the presentation of the British Council’sEnglish Language Teaching and learning in Egypt: an Insight report. In March the Gazette attended the report’s London launch.

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Clouds on the horizon: the perfect storm thesis

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Melanie Butler asks Ben Waxman and Samuel Vetrak how political changes in the UK might affect the ELT and higher education sectors.

What happens to a country’s international education market when harsher immigration policies are introduced, its currency gets stronger and at the same time economic crises batter its source markets? The answer is that international student enrolments go down.

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Top Marks For Europe’s New Unis

Melanie Butler analyses the Times Higher Education rankings for universities less than fifty years old and finds that many of the new stars are from the old world.

Europe dominates the Times Higher Education (THE) rankings of universities under fifty years old. Sixty-two per cent of all 150 universities listed by THE are geographically in Europe, compared to 37 in Asia. However Australasia, with a population of just 28 million people, has twenty ranking new universities, or one per 1.8 million people, compared to one per eight million people in Europe. Australia, with nineteen ranking universities, comes in as the second most successful nation, just behind the UK, which has 25 – alllisted here.

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