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British Teachers Flee Abroad

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Matt Salusbury examines the evidence that more and more UK teachers are opting to take their talents to overseas schools

Data from the International School Consultancy (ISC) shows that in 2014–15 more school teachers left the UK to teach in international schools abroad than qualified as state school teachers via the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) route. As Schools Week magazine put it, there were around 100,000 full-time teachers from the UK in English-medium education in that year, compared to 82,000 UK nationals teaching in international schools the previous year, so 18,000 school teachers must have left the UK to teach in international schools abroad.

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Why good teachers can often miss out

Diane Jacoutot, who recruits Teflers for international schools, looks at a variety of factors that can trip teachers up in their search for a job

Normally the kinds of schools we recruit for at the moment require teacher qualifications such as a bachelors of education rather than just a Tefl certificate. This is a function of the kind of licensing that these schools have – there’s a difference between schools that provide a substitute for compulsory education (eg all subjects using the national curriculum) and schools that teach English as a foreign language only. That being said, most international schools are dominated by host nationals, so they are full of English language learners.

One issue that can affect EFL teachers in some countries is the subject of their first or higher degree. Ministries of education have at times required English teachers to have an English or applied linguistics degree. While this makes some sense if you are hiring someone for whom English is not their first language, as it verifies that the candidate has a proven and verifiable proficiency in the English language, for someone who is from an English-speaking country any degree taught in English, whether it’s science or history, requires proficiency. But many ministries require this for certain levels and jobs so it can be a blocker.

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Vietnam: the good ... the bad ...

Vietnam pic Ho Chi Minh traffic Courtesy M. M

Kevin Martin Doyle summarises why Vietnam is a honey pot for English language teachers, but warns of a few pitfalls facing them

First, the good ...

Vietnam is one of the hottest growth areas in English language teaching. The Vietnamese Ministry of Education and Training has announced that by 2020 all students leaving school must have a minimum level of English. Teachers in state schools are expected to have an even higher level of proficiency.

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English demand ‘to double by 2020’ in the Gulf states

Gulf CCP

Jalpa Trivedi explains why it’s the right time to consider a career with the Council

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) is made up of six member states: Bahrain, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. It is a diverse grouping with a quickly expanding population that offers residents much to explore and experience. New initiatives in education, government and society mean it has the potential to become one of the most globalised parts of the Middle East. Still heavily rooted in its Arab traditions and the Islamic faith, the region nevertheless has attractions for foreign visitors and residents.

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